Tech Analysis

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The app that I chose for this analysis is called Factor Race.  It cost $0.99 through Apple’s App store and can is compatible with iPhones, iPads, and iPod Touch.

According to the app description “Factor Race is a game where the player must identify the binomial factors of trinomial equations.”  Students have to correctly factor different trinomial equations in order to make it around the track.  As students complete each level, they earn better race cars.

I really like the idea of this app.  It’s a fun, interactive way for students to practice factoring without it being another worksheet in class.  I actually stumbled upon this app when I was looking for engaging activities for my students to practice factoring.  However, I spent days trying to get the app to work.  Once it goes through the opening “credits”, you can only see half of the app.  Not being able to see the full screen makes it really difficult to even complete one factoring problem, let alone complete an entire level.  I would really have liked to use this with my students, but I didn’t feel comfortable expending class time with an app that I’m really unsure of how it works beyond its description.  I’m really hoping that the developers fix the bug because I think it would be a great app for algebra students.

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Curriculum Analysis

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Kristen and I shared similar views on how each of three textbooks she looked at approached factoring.  We both agreed that having the repetition-style practice.  With something like factoring, having that kind of practice allows students plenty of familiarity with the process.

We also agreed that it was nice that the Core Connections book outlines in detail what teachers need to address, especially as first year teachers.  It’s easy to get lost in the details, and the CPM curriculum really aims to have an integrated story, so having a detail teachers guide is very beneficial.  We also agreed that it was nice that the Core Connections book had activities that broke up the direct instruction.  I think it’s beneficial, not just because factoring is something that students need to work at on their own to gain mastery, but also because it allows for avenues for students to connect and see the meaningful background for a concept like factoring.

We also agreed that the common errors alert was great.  It’s easy to forget what those errors are because you have so much experience with the concept, but that isn’t true for students.  Knowing where they might make mistakes can help both you and your students, both in terms of being less frustrated by the concept and in ensuring that the students are really understanding what they’re doing.